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Why Swim

Benefits of Good Swimming Workouts

Swimming is one of the most complete forms of low impact cardio exercises and can be enjoyed by people of all ages and proficiency levels.

Fitness Swimming - Aquatic Exercise  Equipment
  • It builds the body, soothes the mind, regulates breathing, and stimulates circulation, with no stress on bones and joints.
  • Because swimming uses almost all the major muscle groups, it can develop strength and endurance while improving posture and flexibility.
  • By placing vigorous demand on heart and lungs, swimming is also one of the best and extraordinary aerobic & aquatic exercises that improves cardiovascular conditioning.
  • Finally, with the least amount of joint stress/impact, swimming has the lowest risk of injury of all sports.
  • Enjoy safe swimming and always consult with your physician to see if swimming is right for you.

 

Safe Swimming Tips

Regular swimming builds endurance, muscle strength, stamina, and cardiovascular fitness. Good swimming workouts can burn more calories than running or cycling. Follow these tips to maximize your workout:

  • Plan your swimming routine to build strength and endurance (for example try swimming a series of sprints followed by brief rests).
  • Before you start swimming take a few minutes to warm up by stretching your arms and shoulders, chest, lower back, and legs.
  • Relax and focus on the rhythm of your stroke and breathing.
  • Alternate different strokes to work different muscle groups.
  • Once you finish swimming, cool down gradually.
  • Drink plenty of fluids before and after your swim workouts.
  • Never swim alone.
  • HomeSwimmer® is not a life saving device and it is not intended for use as a learning device.

 

Good Swim Workouts - A great way to burn calories

With regard to weight loss, fitness swimming gives you the best aerobic workout with the least amount of joint stress or impact. A 1993 study conducted for the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, N.J. found that in a given amount of time competitive swimmers burn 25 percent more calories swimming all out than competitive runners do when running all out. For non-competitive swimmers, the amount of calories burned during a swimming routine will vary based on their weight, the intensity of their good swim workouts, conditioning level, and metabolism. The links below will provide comparative information about calories burned for different types of activities.

Activity (1 hour)
130 lbs
155 lbs
190 lbs
Running, 10-min mile
590
704
863
Swimming laps, freestyle, vigorous effort
590
704
863
Calisthenics, (push-ups, sit-ups), vigorous effort
472
563
690
Running in place
472
563
690
Swimming laps, freestyle, light-moderate effort
472
563
690
Aerobics, high impact
413
493
604
Bicycling, stationary moderate effort
413
493
604
Tennis, general
413
493
604
Aerobics, general
354
422
518
Stair treadmill ergometer, general
354
422
518
Aerobics, low impact
295
352
431
Calisthenics, home, light-moderate effort
266
317
388
Bicycling, 10 mph leisure
236
281
345
Walking, 4 mph, very brisk pace
236
281
345

Source. Nutristrategy.com

Activity (1 hour)
100 lbs
150 lbs
200 lbs
Running, 5.5 mph
440
660
962
Swimming, 50 yds/min
325
500
650
Walking, 4.5 mph
295
440
572
Tennis, singles
265
400
535
Bicycling, 12 mph
270
410
534
Bicycling, 6 mph
160
240
312

Source. American Heart Association

 

Swimming Stats

Swimming is commonly recognized as one of the best forms of exercise there is. It provides most of the aerobic benefits that running does, with many of the benefits of training with pool exercise equipment.

  • Swimming uses almost all the major muscle groups and places vigorous demand on the heart and lungs. It develops muscle strength and endurance, and improves posture and flexibility. Most importantly, swimming is a low-impact form of exercise that people of all ages and levels of fitness can take up.
  • In fact, according to the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, 95.3 million Americans aged 6 and older enjoyed recreational swimming in 2004, the highest number among all fitness-related recreational activities.
  • In the case of fitness swimming, the number of Americans aged 6 and older who participated at least once in this activity during 2004 is 15.6 million, a 10.6% increase over 2000.  Within this group, the number of frequent participants (100 days or more) is 2.5 million in 2004 up 20% from 2000.
  • The average age of the frequent swimmer is 35.2, household income is $71,000, and he/she has been swimming for an average of 11.4 years.